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Ten favorite works from Art Basel Miami Beach (OVR) / 2 - 6 December 2020


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1. JANE DICKSON

TRUST ME, NEW YORKER SELF PORTRAIT, 1992

60.0 X 50.8 (CM)

OIL ON CELOTEX

$20,000

JAMES FUENTES GALLERY


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About the artist: Jane Dickson is known for her vivid depictions of Times Square’s nocturnal energy. Born in Chicago, Dickson arrived in New York in 1977, and a year later began a job programming visuals for Times Square’s first digital billboard. She mostly worked the night shift and was responsible for the New Year’s Eve countdown, witness to upturned faces basking in the hallucinatory glow. Two years later she moved to an apartment on 43rd Street and 8th Avenue, where she lived and raised two children with her husband. From this vantage point, Dickson observed Times Square after dark, absorbing the seductive haze and structured environment in which figures and shadows moved.


Solo exhibitions of her work have been shown at The Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris, Creative Time, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Major museums including The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago, the Karamay Museum in Xin Jiang, China, and most recently the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian own her artworks. In 2008 she completed a mosaic for MTA in the 42nd street station. Her work is also represented in corporate collections such as Microsoft Corporation, The 3M Corporate Collection, and The Paine Weber Collection. Her images have appeared extensively in books and periodicals.





2. DAN FLAVIN

UNTITLED, 1969

244 CM ACROSS THE CORNER

BLUE, PINK, YELLOW LIGHTS & FIXTURES

EDITION 1 OF 5

2 LIFETIME EDITIONS FABRICATED

$750,000 - 1,000,000

PAULA COOPER GALLERY


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About the artist: Dan Flavin was an American artist and pioneer of Minimalism, best known for his seminal installations of light fixtures. His illuminated sculptures offer a rigorous formal and conceptual investigation of space and light, wherein the artist arranged commercial fluorescent bulbs into differing geometric compositions. “I like art as thought better than art as work,” he once said. “I've always maintained this. It's important to me that I don't get my hands dirty. It's not because I'm instinctively lazy. It's a declaration: art is thought.” Born on April 1, 1933 in Jamaica, NY, Flavin showed an interest in art during his early adulthood, and went on to study at the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts before attending Columbia University. Working exclusively with fluorescent lights by 1961, he embraced the temporary nature of his art—which often shattered or blew out—and was happy to replace parts of his works as needed. His dedication to simple forms, use of industrial materials, and symbolic meaning allied his practice to the work of both Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt.


Flavin was the subject of a major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum in New York in 1992. The artist died in Riverhead, NY on November 29, 1996. Today, his works are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Dia: Beacon in New York, the Menil Collection in Houston, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., among others.



3. ANNE COLLIER

WOMAN CRYING (COMIC) #29, 2020

126.4 X 148.6 (CM)

C-TYPE PRINT

EDITION OF 5 + 2 AP

$28,000

ANTON KERN GALLERY


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About the artist:

Anne Collier considers herself a still life photographer—her subjects just happen to be other photographs and found media. A large teardrop flows down the delicate cheek of a beautiful woman… This is a recurring motif picked up by Anne Collier who enjoys photographing magazine covers, postcards, posters, CD covers, old books, manuals, and calendars from the 1960s–80s. The artist singles out images featuring women, shedding light on their exploitation as objects of desire. Anne Collier has a knack for identifying archetypal representations of women in commercial images. Using her installations she then brings out this mythical substratum, which challenges, unsettles, and even incenses us.


Born in 1970 in Los Angeles, the artist began researching female representation in collective imagination in the early 2000s. She soon ventured into the outlying areas, unsatisfied with lambasting consumer society driven by hedonism and the objectification of the female body. Collier started raising questions about the role of the photographer and the striking power of his (or her) images. She photographs herself in the act of photographing and, using an imposing camera, lines up images of women in the act of taking a photo. Woman thus becomes invested with power. Anne Collier seems to be saying that what matters is not the gender, but rather who occupies the dominant position of the taker of photographs, i.e. who possesses the power to photograph. Ultimately, the artist’s conceptual images denounce this power-function and the complicity of a world resolutely turned to photography even as it abuses its power.



4. KENNETH NOLAND

RIZE, 1965

165.1 X 165.1 (CM)

ACRYLIC ON CANVAS

$500,000 - 750,000

YARES ART GALLERY


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About the artist: Born in Asheville, South Carolina, in 1924, Kenneth Noland is today recognized as one of the most important contributors to Color Field painting. His father was, as Noland described, a “Sunday painter,” or amateur artist; his stock of brushes, paints and other materials allowed a young Noland to experiment with painting, and influenced his later decision to pursue art. In 1942, he graduated from high school and voluntarily joined the US Armed Forces, and spent almost four years in the Air Force.


By the late 1950s, Noland began exhibiting his first, now iconic, canvases composed of concentric circles of various colors. In the early 1960s, feeling that the “Circle” painting motif had been exhausted, he began expanding his formal composition to include abstracted chevrons. A selection of his works, alongside those by Louis, Frankenthaler, Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella, and others, were included by Greenberg in the seminal group exhibition Post-Painterly Abstraction at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the term was coined by Greenberg, and has largely been associated with all the artists shown in the exhibition since. Later the same year, Noland participated in representing the United States at the Venice Biennale, where he showed both his “Circle” and “Chevron” paintings alongside work by Louis, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg.


Noland never ceased experimenting with his chosen motifs throughout the rest of his career, and continually produced bold compositions until his death in 2010. Noland’s ability to synthesize various mid-century artistic modes, from geometric abstraction to color theory, both solidified his oeuvre in the art historical canon of the period, but also helped herald in later movements such as Minimalism and Neo Geo. His works are held in the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; and the Tate Modern, London.




5. NOLAN SIMON

ATTRACTION, 2020

50.8 X 40.6 (CM)

OIL AND GRAPHITE ON LINEN MOUNTED ON BOARD

$7,000

47 CANAL GALLERY


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About the artist: Feet, hands, chests and backs populate Simon’s gaze, but we see less of the limbs that conjoin these. At once objective and unfixed, each painting takes a found photograph as its source. The connections that surround the original images are difficult to trace, their context shedded in the oceans of visual information that submerge the everyday world. A person becomes a pair of hands lifting an iPhone, and its unbearable mass, above purplish, lukewarm bathwater. In these detached, fragmentary portraits, questions about intimacy are posed. Privacy is staged. Spontaneity is contested. Meaning builds like waves rippling against the side of a tub as the body, gliding gently downwards, rests.


Nolan Simon was born in 1980 in Detroit, Michigan, and now lives and works in New York City. His work has been included in exhibitions at Thomas Erben Gallery, White Columns, John Connelly Presents, Sculpture Center, and Malcolm Glenn Project Space in New York; Cave, Detroit; Public Surface, Stockholm; ASPN, Leipzig; and on a plateau in the southern Swiss Alps. This is his first solo exhibition in New York.




6. FRANZ WEST

UNTITLED, 2008

234.6 X 102.1 X 60.0 (CM)

PAPIER-MÂCHÉ, LACQUER, POLYSTYRENE, AND METAL CAN ON ARTIST'S PEDESTAL

$860,000

LÉVY GORVY GALLERY


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About the artist:

Franz West was an Austrian sculptor and Conceptual artist. Perhaps best known for his colorful, playful public art, his work can be found in cities all over the world, notably including New York’s Central Park. Born on February 16, 1947 in Vienna, Austria, West did not begin studying art until the age of 30, graduating from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna in 1983. His early work was inspired by the Viennese Actionism movement of the early 70s, consisting of applying or “adapting” new materials to everyday objects such as wrapping coke bottles in gauze or creating large “sausage-like” sculptures out of welded metal. During this time, West also developed a series of Adaptives, humorous plaster abstract objects meant to be worn on the face or around the waist. At documenta IX, the artist debuted his first large-scale public installation: Auditorium, featuring 72 couches made of steel, carpets, and foam placed in a parking lot, garnering critical acclaim and the attention of the international art world.


He had solo exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1997 and Whitechapel Gallery in London, among others, and died at the age of 65 on July 25, 2012 in Vienna, Austria.



7. MING SMITH

SYMMETRY ON THE IVORY COAST, ABIDJAN, 1972

60.5 X 52.6 (CM)

PHOTOGRAPHY (EDITION OF 5 + 2 AP)

$10,000 - 25,000

PIPPY HOULDSWORTH GALLERY


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About the artist:

Ming Smith grew up in Columbus, Ohio and moved to New York in the early 1970s. There she worked with a wide network of fellow artists, musicians and dancers. She was the first, and for many years, the only woman member of the Kamoinge Workshop, a collective of African American photographers based in New York. The group formed with the joint aim to challenge negative representations of black communities and to develop photography as an artistic practice. In 1975 she was the first African American woman photographer to have work acquired by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Throughout her career she has travelled extensively, capturing life in America, Africa, Europe and East Asia.


The artist’s work has been presented in exhibitions including Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, Tate Modern, London (2017), touring to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, (2018); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2018); The Broad, Los Angeles (2019); De Young Museum, San Francisco (2020); We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women 1965-85, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2017); Arthur Jafa: A Series of Utterly Improbably, Yet Extraordinary Renditions, Serpentine Galleries, London (2017), touring to Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2019); Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2010). A comprehensive monograph will be published by Aperture towards the end of the 2020. Smith will be included in Just Above Midtown, Museum of Modern Art New York (2022).


Smith’s work is held in the collections of Brooklyn Museum, New York; Detroit Institute of Arts; Philadelphia Museum of Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York; Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, Washington; Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture, Washington; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.




8. GÜNTHER FÖRG

UNTITLED, 1988

OIL ON LEAD ON WOOD

120.0 X 90.0 (CM)

EUR 450,000

GALLERIA MASSIMO DE CARLO


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About the artist: In his practice Günther Förg (1952-2013, b. Fussen, Germany) who was highly inspired by abstract influences and modernism, has explored tangible ways of reflecting on materiality and on the gesture, using shapes and geometry in order to balance rational and irrational, the works of the mind and those of the gut, by tackling an array of mediums that include painting, sculpture and photography. In this work from 1988, (Untitled), Förg entered a new phase of experimentation, which brought him to incorporate new materials, such wood, copper, bronze, and lead. The artwork is part of the renowned lead series, characterized by painted sheets of lead supported by wooden frames, that blurs the line between painting and sculpture.

Gunther Förg (1952-2013) was born in Fussen, Germany in 1952. His work has been shown in important institutions such as Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas (2018); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2018); Museum Brandhorst, Munich (2014); Museo Carlo Bilotti, Rome (2013); Fountain Beyeler, Basel (2009); Langen Foundation in Neuss, Neuss (2007); Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel (2006); Gemeentemuseum, The Hague (2006); Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv (2002); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía/Palacio de Velazquez, Madrid (1998); Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (1991); Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach (1989) and SFMoMa, San Francisco (1989). Works by Förg are part of major museum collections such as the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Museum fur Monderne Kunst, Frankfurt; Ludwig Museum, Cologne; Tate Modern, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; SFMoMa, San Francisco; and Hamburger Bahnhof-Museum fur Gegenwart, Berlin.




9. HIROKI TSUKUDA

176.0 X 126.0 X 4.3 (CM)

CHARCOAL, ACRYLIC INK, PENCIL ON PAPER, WOOD PANEL WITH SILKSCREEN PRINTED ACRYLIC FRAME

$28,000

NANZUKA GALLERY


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About the artist:

Hiroki Tsukuda was born in 1978 in Kagawa, Japan. He graduated from the Department of Imaging Arts & Sciences at Musashino Art University in 2001. Tsukuda lives and works in Tokyo.


The artist’s drawings and digital collage explore the turbulent, futuristic cityscapes of his imaginings. Created with meticulous detail, these intricate, monochromatic works illustrate collapsed spaces, in which mechanized worlds merge with sci-fi mythos in states of controlled chaos and organic mutation. Similarly, Tsukuda creates installation works out of raw industrial material, flora, and found objects that transpire directly from the artist’s drawings.


Tsukuda’s has mounted solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, Gunma (2019); Capitain Petzel (2018); Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen, Germany (2017); and Nanzuka, Tokyo (2014), among others. He has been included in group exhibitions at the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo (2019); Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong (2019); Jack Hanley Gallery, New York (2016); and Brandenburgischer Kunstverein Postdam e.V., Potsdam (2015), among others.



10. RICHARD TUTTLE

SAFE HEAD, 2020

53.3 X 43.2 X 4.8 (CM)

PLYWOOD, SPRAY PAINT, WOOD GLUE, AND NAILS

$50'000

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY


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About the artist:

Over the last six decades, Richard Tuttle has become one of the most representative American artists of the postwar period, occupying interstitial positions between several genres, including painting, sculpture, drawing, and poetry. He consistently opens new possibilities for a variety of mediums and materials, demonstrating how traditional categories of artmaking can function as starting points for unhindered, open investigations into the functioning of perception and language. Safe Head (2020) is one from a series of recent works in which an organic plywood construction becomes a surface for painterly experimentation. Occupying an uncanny middle ground between speed and slowness—not to mention between intentionality and aleatory surrender—the work appears to emerge of its own accord, faithful only to its materials and the ungovernable textures of time and nature. For all its radical insistence on maintaining its own genre, Safe Head trades in a number of traditional visual pleasures, with chiaroscuro-like transitions between light and dark passages, and the interplay between flatness and depth—including a number of shadows and seemingly labyrinthine chambers that animate the space between the viewer’s eye and the wall—serving as metaphors for the perennially slippery status of art as a means of expression and cultural reflection. Since the 1970s, Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey; lives and works in New York and Abiquiú, New Mexico) has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at museums throughout the world, including most recently M Woods Museum, Beijing (2019); Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. (2018); Kunstmuseum aan Zee, Ostend, Belgium (2017); Museo de Arte de Lima (2016); Metropolitan Museum of Art (2016); and Whitechapel Gallery and Tate Modern, London (2014). In 2005–2006, a retrospective exhibition organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art traveled to five additional institutions, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. His work is included in over sixty public collections, including those of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Dallas Museum of Art; and Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam.


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© Cramer Mitterrand Art Advisory. 2020